Stumbling Through The Savoy Cocktail Book

So one of my more recent acquisitions in my journey to collect cocktails books has been The Savoy Cocktail Book, by Harry Craddock.  This has got to be one of the best cocktail books ever written.  It contains a few hundred different cocktails with various ingredients, some of which you can’t buy today.  I may have to even make some of the ingredients to try and shake everything up.  The best thing about making all the cocktails, is the tasting and photo taking.  On any slow night, I try to make atleast 5 classic cocktails and take pictures.  Without further ado, here’s number 1.

The Abbey Cocktail

1.5 oz Dry Gin

.75 oz Kina Lillet (I used Cocchi Americano)

.75 Orange Juice

1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Take all ingredients in a mixing glass and shake thoroughly.  Strain through a Hawthorne strainer into a cocktail glass.

Absinthe Cocktail

1.5 oz St. George Absinthe

1.5 oz Water

1 Dash Simple Syrup (1:1 Ratio)

1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Take all ingredients in place in a mixing glass.  Shake thoroughly and use a Hawthorne strainer to strain into a sherry glass.

Absinthe (Special) Cocktail

1 oz St. George Absinthe

.5 oz Bombay Gin

.5 oz Simple Syrup (1:1 Ratio)

1 Dash Orange Bitters

1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Place all ingredients in a mixing glass.  Shake very hard and single strain with a Hawthorne strainer into a Martini glass.  Garnish with an orange wheel or lemon twist.

Addington Cocktail

1.5 oz Dry Vermouth (I used Rossi)

1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth (I used Cinzano)

Place all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice.  Stir with a bar spoon 20-30 times and use a Julep strainer to strain over ice in a bucket glass.

Garnish with a peel of orange squeezed over the top, rim the glass and then drop the peel in the cocktail.

Adonis Cocktail

1.5 oz Dry Sherry

.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

1 Dash Orange Bitters

Add all ingredients into a mixing glass.  Fill with ice and stir with a bar spoon 20-30 times.  Strain with a Julep strainer into a Martini glass.

Affinity Cocktail

.75 oz Dry Vermouth

.75 oz Sweet Vermouth

.75 Scotch Whisky (I used Dewars 12 Year Blended)

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters

Add all ingredients into a mixing glass.  Add ice and stir with a bar spoon 20-30 times.  Use a Julep strainer to strain into a Martini glass.

Take a small peel of lemon and squeeze over the cocktail.  Rim the glass with the peel and drop into the drink.

After Dinner Cocktail

1 oz Prunelle Brandy

1 oz Cherry Brandy (I ended up using Luxardo Cherry Liqueur)

.5 oz lemon juice

Add all ingredients to a mixing glass.  Add ice and shake vigorously.  Hawthorne strain into a sherry glass and serve.

After Supper Cocktail

1 oz Apricot Brandy

1 oz Orange Curacao

.5 oz lemon juice

Add ice to a mixing glass.  The combine all the ingredients and shake thoroughly.  Use a Hawthorne strainer to strain into a sherry glass.

Take a long lemon twist and twist it over the cocktail to spread out the oils.  Rim the sherry glass with the twist and let it hang off the rim of the glass.

Alaska Cocktail

2 oz Dry Gin

.5 oz Yellow Chartreuse

Combine all the ingredients over ice and stir with a bar spoon for 20-30 seconds.  Use a Julep strainer to pour into a Martini glass.

Take a small peel of lemon and twist over the Martini glass to unleash the oils on the drink surface.  Rim the glass and drop into the drink.

I was a big fan of The Abbey Cocktail.  Ever since I found Cocchi Americano, I like using it as a bittering agent in cocktails.  The angostura and orange juice gives it a burned orange color and the lemon twist adds nice citrus notes.  The Absinthe cocktail was more tame than I thought.  The St. George is 120 proof so it can get quite hot and peppery.  I actually prefer the Absinthe Drip over this cocktail though.  The Special cocktail was definitely better.  Two types of bitters add some subtle flavors to the absinthe and the gin adds more citrus notes, which I really enjoyed.  The Addington Cocktail is phenomenal!  I had never tried a cocktail with that much dry vermouth in it before.  I first got the orange oils in my nose as I first smelled the cocktail.  I took my first sip and the spices between both vermouths married together and danced around on my palate.  I still want to play around with the Adonis more.  There’s more Amontillado’s, Fino’s and maybe even some Oloroso’s I’d like to try in the drink.  Just like the Adonis, the Affinity Cocktail has a lot of potential.  I only used a 12 year blended Scotch Whisky, but there are so many Scotch’s out there that can be very smokey, medicinal, peat powered, grassy, honeyed and fruit flavored.  I would like to see how all these flavors play with all the other ingredients.  The After Dinner Cocktail was not made in the true form.  I need to go get some Herring Cherry Brandy, although I am still satisfied with the Luxardo Cherry I used.  Next time I make it, I will post pictures of the outcome as well as the flavoring.  The After Supper Cocktail was my second favorite libation I enjoyed.  The peach flavoring zips together nicely with the Curacao.  I wanted to drink the whole thing, but while tasting all these cocktails I was all ready starting to get really buzzed.  The last cocktail I made was the Alaska Cocktail.  By far my favorite, but once again someone at work will say “Oh God you’re weird!”.  Yes I am, and Yes I like being weird.  I love Chartreuse!  What can I say.  Gin, Chartreuse and Citrus peel always comes together in such a harmonious way.  I always try to skinny dip my nose in the cocktail before I quench my thirst to get a first impression.  I pick up the herbs from the chartreuse and the oils off of the lemon.  I then get a little intimate with the drink and get a small taste and everything just melts in my mouth.  This just may be my next after dinner cocktail at home instead of the Martinez’ I’ve been enjoying.  I might try making an Alaska with Old Tom Gin by Ransom to pull out some more sweetness too.  Later this week, I’ll post the next 5 to 10 cocktails in the book.  Thanks again everyone for reading!

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~ by myamericandram on March 8, 2011.

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